Nutribullet 600 Series
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Does the Nutribullet live up to the hype?

You can’t have escaped the hype about this ingenious little gadget that everyone is raving about. Fêted for its health benefits, praised for its sleek styling – if you believe what you read, then Magicbullet’s Nutribullet 600 can do no wrong.

But to be completely honest with you, we were not really convinced. Despite the praise of cousins, brothers, aunties, friends and parents we simply couldn’t see what the fuss was about. It was just a blender right? And a pretty expensive one at that. And we had a blender already, a little one that had been used to create baby purées, guacamole and salsa galore. So why did we need a Nutribullet? We didn’t – did we?

Then Father Christmas intervened…

So Christmas came and with it a NutriBullet 600 series arrived in a beautifully wrapped package. There was no more excuse not to give it a whirl. And without wanting to give too much away at this stage, that was when everything changed…

We had a little blender already, one that had made baby purées galore. Why would we need a Nutribullet?

Summer berries
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So what exactly is the NutriBullet?

The company behind the NutriBullet, Homeland Housewares, argues that it’s not a blender, but an ‘extractor’ and claims that there isn’t another blender like it on the market. The difference is a subtle but very important one. Because of its exclusive ‘Cyclonic Action’ it can break the pulp, skin, seeds and stems of plants down into tiny particles. These, it argues, can’t be accessed by chewing, juicing or blending with ordinary blenders.

Nutribullet lays claim to many health benefits as a result of this ‘bioavailability’. And whilst we can’t verify whether or not these are accurate, we can agree that nuts, seeds and pulp are certainly pulverised with each blast of the NutriBullet 600 series.

What does the Nutribullet 600 Series look like?

The design of the Nutribullet 600 series is sleek and has a footprint of only 200mmx300mm. This means that it can be accommodated easily on most kitchen worktops – an important factor if you’re planning to use it every day. The power cord is 1.45m which is just about right for most circumstances, long enough without being too bulky.

It comes in a range of colours including silver, graphite, cherry red and piano black and the price can vary accordingly, but expect to pay around £70-£80 for a 600 series.

What kit comes with the Nutribullet 600 series?

The NutriBullet 600 ships in a 12 piece set. This includes the all-important power base, three cups (one of 680ml, and two of 380ml) that you use both for creating your ‘Nutriblast’ smoothie and for drinking out of. Then there is a lip-ring, a lip ring with a handle (one of the cups has an in-built handle so just having one extra is OK) and a recipe book and quick-start guide. Two blades are provided – the four-handled extractor blade (you’ll get the most use out of this one) and the two-handled milling blade that is used for grinding down nuts and seeds into a fine power or flour. Finally two sealing caps allow you to take your Nutriblast with you, simply screw one on and off you go.

What happened when we made our first Nutriblast?

Here at A Juicy Blend we are not always the best at reading the instruction manual. A quick briefing from a friend in the know and off we went headlong into our first Nutriblast. A tempting mix of kale, frozen mixed berries, banana and water. There was a max line on the cup so it was pretty obvious that you weren’t supposed to fill beyond that point. We wanted it to be thick so we just put about two fingers deep of water into the bottom of the large cup.

There was a pungent burning smell and an ominous screeching noise. All was not well…

Starting up the Nutribullet couldn’t be easier. There’s no on button, so simply fill your cup with the selected fruit and veg, screw on the blade, and then turn it upside-down and hook it into the niches on the power-base. Then switch on at the mains (making sure you’re holding tight to the cup) and it will start up instantly. After about 10 seconds the blade stuck, the motor’s admittedly pretty loud hum turned up to a screech and an ominous burning rubber smell began to permeate the kitchen. We quickly flipped off the power and consulted the instructions. Fill with liquid to the max line. Ah, so not two fingers’ worth then.
Other rookie errors that we committed during our early use of the Nutribullet 600 series included trying to make a Nutriblast with a wet cup and blade (it didn’t seal tight enough and so the lid shook loose as the motor turned, leaving our liquid mixture to leak all over the Power Base), and putting the blade in the dishwasher. This last meant that the all-important rubber ring inside the bottom of the blade came loose and we ended up slicing it – cue more burning rubber smell.
After a while we admitted defeat and actually looked at the instructions. All of these points and more are addressed in painstaking detail. Our conclusion: if you bother to take a look then there’s very little that can go wrong.
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Nectarines
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Incase you were wondering where we goofed – the liquid should go to the max line or just below if you want a slightly thicker shake. The cups can go in the dishwasher (top rack) but not the blades – but all they need usually is a quick dunk in some hot soapy water. It’s really not a big deal to clean them. The Power Base doesn’t get dirty provided you follow the instructions, but if it does then wipe it out with a damp cloth – on no account submerge it in water.

How to make a Nutriblast

The basic ‘Nutriblast’ (the name that Nutribullet gives to its smoothie-like concoctions) couldn’t be simpler to create, and can be summarised in three basic steps:

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1.

The first step is to choose a cup and fill it 50% with leafy greens. For the beginner who is looking for a more subtle taste then baby spinach or spring greens are a good option

2.

The second step is to fill the remaining 50% with fruit. Popular options for first-timers include mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, blackberries etc) and some banana for added creaminess. If you use frozen berries then they have the added benefit of making the smoothie slightly thicker and refreshingly chilled.

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3.

Next you need to add liquid. As we mentioned above it’s imperative that you add enough liquid to the smoothie or the Nutribullet 600 series simply won’t be able to function. Choose water if you’re really looking to keep the calories down, or try milk, almond milk or another flavoured dairy substitute if you so fancy.

4.

Add an optional ‘Boost’ of nuts, seeds or something like goji berries to add some extra nutritional value to your Nutriblast. For example a table-spoon of flax seed can bump up your Omega 3.

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That’s it – you’re ready to go. Simply screw on the extractor blade to the top of your cup, and turn the whole thing upside-down onto your power base. As soon as the cup is locked in place the 600w motor will start the blades turning. Strong suction cups keep the Power Base still on the work surface, but we always hold on just in case. Your Nutriblast will be ready in anything from 30 seconds to over a minute, depending on the ingredients that you’ve used. The book does advise you not to run the NutriBullet for much longer than a minute without pausing, to prevent the blades from getting too hot. You can also ‘pulse’ if you’re looking for a more granular texture, for example when making something like guacamole.

So what are the downsides?

What do we think could be improved with the NutriBullet 600 series? In all honesty not a lot, and in fact two of the main issues are addressed in different Nutribullet models.

  • The motor is noisy – you can’t easily carry on a conversation whilst you’re blending, but then as this is likely only to last about a  minute it’s no particular hardship.
  • There is a danger of your Nutriblast exploding out of the cup if you haven’t screwed the blade on properly – one of the down-sides of the upside-down design is that gravity tends to have its way in dramatic style, as we found out! However this shouldn’t happen if cup and blade are properly dry and you’ve tightened the blade properly.
  • We find that even the larger 680 ml cup is not really that big if you’re planning to use your Nutriblast as a meal substitute, and it would be nice to be able to make a double-portion to save later. However if you were to purchase the NutriBullet Pro 900 series then it is possible to add a 946ml ‘Colossus’ cup.
  • Finally you can’t put hot ingredients into the NutriBullet 600 series – if you’re using it to make soup then you need to either use raw ingredients and have a cold soup or cook and cool, then blend and finally reheat the mixture. This again is no particular hardship, and if soup-making is something that you plan to do regularly then you might want to consider looking at the NutriBullet Rx which has an inbuilt heating component.

Product technical details

Nutribullet 600 series

  • Item weight: 3.6 kg+Product dimensions: 30 x 20 x 34.5 cm+Power / wattage: 600 watts+Voltage: 230 volts

Frequently asked questions about the Nutribullet 600 series

Is the NutriBullet 600 series a juicer or a blender?
It is closer to a blender, because unlike a juicer it doesn’t remove the pulp and other fibrous materials. However NutriBullet claims that it is unique in its function because of the Cyclonic Action that extracts more nutrients than regular blenders.
Can you use it like a regular blender eg. to make hummus, dips etc?
It is possible to keep the contents somewhat thicker and less smooth by ‘pulsing’ rather than blending consistently. We have recipes on A Juicy Blend for hummus and other dips that can be made in the NutriBullet.
Can I add frozen berries or spinach to the Nutribullet?
Yes, using frozen fruit and veg creates a beautifully chilled and creamy smoothie. Just note that if the pieces are too big then it’s probably worth letting them thaw slightly so that it doesn’t cause the motor any problem. However the Nutribullet manual says you can fill with up to 25% ice so this shows it doesn’t have a problem tackling it.
Do you have to add liquid into the smoothie before blending?
Yes absolutely! Fill close to the max line with liquid to prevent any issues.
Can you juice carrots in the NutriBullet?
You can certainly blend carrots in the nutribullet – but as stated elsewhere this is not a juicer so you won’t get pure carrot juice as an outcome, you’ll get a thicker liquid that contains all the pulp as well.
How filling is a Nutriblast?
We find that a Nutriblast containing a whole banana, spinach, mixed fruits / veg and flax seeds made in the large cup can easily act as a meal substitute. Pop in some oats or nuts for breakfast and you shouldn’t feel hungry until lunch time!

Our conclusion

So as a single-serving blender that is quick and convenient to use, the Nutribullet certainly does the job. Far from remaining sceptical, we have become converts and are using ours once or twice a day, every day. At around £70-£80 it is a purchase worth considering, especially if you want to increase the amount of fruit and veg in your diet. In short, we love our NutriBullet 600 and can’t imagine being without it!

If you think that you might be looking for a more or less powerful machine, then why not have a read of our Magic bullet vs Nutribullet review or our NutriBullet 600 series vs Nutribullet Pro 900 series showdown.